Legacy Leaving and Statue Building — What Is Your Vision for 2015?

The kings of old didn’t do things small.

Our kids are a huge disappointment to us. Seriously, the Richardsons are leaving nothing in this world when we exit, and it is all those kids’ fault.


In several short months, one of them is going to be leaving that name behind for a new one. Eventually, it is assumed (but not a necessity) the other two will marry as well. Not that they could not keep their names—they choose not to. (Unless one of them gets engaged to a guy named, say, Snuffleupagus or something. Then, please reconsider, kiddo.)

Nor will they carry on the family business. None of our daughters wants to be a doctor. (Their mother may have swayed them a bit with her horror stories. Or her preference for Shakespeare over intestines.) They will never be practice partners with dad. In the ways traditional families measure legacies, we’re slacking. Fortunately, we don’t care. There are more important legacies to leave.

Last week, we talked about how our children reflect our character. It’s an analogy for how we reflect God’s character as his children and his image. But there is even more to being a child, and an image, than reflecting behaviors and ideas.

Our children are the ones we entrust to carry into this world what we find important. They are the ones we hope and believe will take on our values and visions for the future.

Sometimes it’s a family business; sometimes it’s a family name. I hope, more often, it’s treasured beliefs like caring for others, protecting family ties, and persevering through a difficult task. We won’t be here to continue what was important to us. We dream that they will.

God has the same dream. 


He not only made us to reflect his character–he created us to see his vision.  . We’re not meant to simply be nice people in this world. A computer knows how to generate good manners. We’re meant to spread God’s values like rain after a California drought. To make our world loving and just, not settle for making ourselves good people.

Giant Statues and Kingdom Stakes


In the ancient world, kings set up images of themselves in the outer regions of their kingdom. Why? Other people might just send an email with a photo attachment. A strongly worded memo. But these guys figured, hey, I’m a king. I don’t do things small. Giant statues? Let’s get on this thing!

There was a reason. See, when your kingdom is far flung, and your transportation system is a chariot, and there is no satellite programming to get your message out on 347 channels, you’ve got to have a Plan B. And their plan was to establish statues that would stand in for them. The figures would have their authority. Whatever a person would be expected to do in the king’s actual presence he is expected to do for the statue. The image was a representative of the real thing. It had the authority of the king.

That’s the idea we’re supposed to get from being told in Genesis 1 that we are created in the image of God. You (you as in people–you and I) have been placed in the outer reaches of the kingdom as God’s own representative. You have his authority to do what he would do. You’re like an emissary sent our from your country to offer aid to this government and counsel to this other one.

This makes for an entirely different plot line than just looking at the image of God idea as “Wow, maybe I should kind of act better.” It’s, “Wow, there’s an entire kingdom at stake here, and I’m spending my days hanging out on Facebook arguing over who should have won the Golden Globes.” Arguing nicely, understand, because I’m the image of God.

We are a people called to mirror his character and his vision into a crazy world. That’s way bigger than “Share this picture if you love Jesus.” Crazy bigger.

We’re the delegation he has sent out to accomplish what the King wants for His kingdom. You’re an envoy. For the King of the universe. That’s serious stuff right there. Potentially scary. And unbelievably exciting.

(Side note: If we’re sent to do what he would do? We’d better be quite sure what he would do. And fyi, I don’t think launching hate campaigns against people who don’t think like us is on the short list of things God would do.)

Giant Changes and Kingdom Strategies


For this little guy? She is Jesus.

How would it change your day to day priorities if you got out of bed today thinking, “I’m an emissary for God?” How would it mess with your agenda? Change your schedule? Slow your hurried walk past people you work with, shop with, go to school with? Deflect the criticism on your tongue or push out the encouragement? Keep you from thinking “someone should fix that problem” and start you fixing it yourself?


If we looked one person in the eyes and thought, how can I represent God to her? Right here, right now? Not in a 4-Spiritual-Laws shove the gospel at her kind of way but in a Jesus-would-do-this style. If we saw one social issue of our time and, instead of wringing our hands or focusing blame on one side, thought, how does God see this? How can I bring light and love into the darkness of this bad situation?

I used to think I wanted to go into politics. Now I know I’m not cut out for the mind games involved. Yet I have the responsibility of standing in for the King.

God says He’s looking for someone to go on an adventure. Are you ready?


Next week—What does being in God’s image mean for how we treat others? How about ourselves? Which one is harder for you?

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